Exhibition // The Photocopy Club & Space Is Ace

The Photocopy Club // Space Is Ace

The Photocopy Club // Space Is Ace Flyer

On February 13th at 7pm Space Is Ace and The Photocopy Club are collaborating on a one-night only show at Doomed Gallery, 65-67 Ridley Road, Dalston.
Facebook Event
Eventbrite

ABOUT THE PHOTOCOPY CLUB

The Photocopy Club produce regular exhibitions featuring photocopied/xerox photographs from photographers around the world. The Photocopy Club aim to get photography off the Internet and get printed matter back in the the hands of the public. TPC believe that photocopying is one of the cheapest ways to get photography printed, and are inspired by zine culture.
Check out The Photocopy Club Vimeo to see examples of their past exhibitions.

ABOUT SPACE IS ACE

Space Is Ace hold regular events in which they express fascination with the universe, and we regularly invite like-minded artists, musicians, scientists and technologists to work with us. Space Is Ace have previously collaborated with super / collider & The Arts Catalyst‘s POP ROCK MOON SHOP and MEOW.

Space Is Ace is keen to rework the tired and overly formal private view format, instead welcoming playfulness and experimentation. Space Is Ace believe that audiences engage with our ideas in an immersive and interactive environment.  In previous shows, we have achieved this by inviting sound artists who attempt to recreate the sounds interpreted by NASA’s Space Voyagers. We have also created light installations, data visualizations and even an edible solar system!

The Space Is Ace Collective was born from the first ever year of the MA Art and Science degree at the prestigious Central Saint Martins.

WITH SOUNDS FROM

7PM

DJ DIE DIE DIE

9PM
THE FRACTAL SKULLS
An audio collage with NASA audio archive material and their own music.

The Fractal Skulls - Sam Pritchard

The Fractal Skulls – Sam Pritchard

SELECTED SUBMISSIONS

Sarah Hull - http://sarah-hull.com/

Sarah Hull – http://sarah-hull.com/

 

Marta Santuccio http://www.effluo.com

Marta Santuccio http://www.effluo.com

Daniela de Paulis danieladepaulis.com

Daniela de Paulis danieladepaulis.com

Interview: Deborah Parkin

We interviewed artist Deborah Parkin, asking her questions about her work with alternative photography processes…

Deborah Parkin

Deborah Parkin

Deborah Parkin - Picnic

Deborah Parkin – Picnic

Deborah Parkin - The Enchanted Forest

Deborah Parkin – The Enchanted Forest

Deborah-Parkin-bunny-mask-and-gun

When did you start using alternative photography processes?

I started using alternative photography processes about five or six years ago as it was one of my modules on a course I was doing.  We did pinhole, cyanotype and argyrotype,  absolutely loved it and knew that I wanted to explore more.

Why/when did you begin to use the collodion process?

I have loved the work of Julia Margaret Cameron for many years as hers was the first photographic exhibition I went too. I also visited the archives in Bradford and spent hours pouring over her prints, as well as prints by Lady Clementina Hawarden.
However, at the time I didn’t know of anyone who was teaching the process and the chemistry was not as readily available as it is now. For a while, I didn’t know where to start.  This changed about four years ago when my path crossed with Carl Radford. I had been in touch with Quinn Jacobson for advice and he pointed me in Carl’s direction. So,  On my 40th birthday I participated in Carl’s workshop and learned the process with him.

What do you think of the resurgence in interest with the Wet Collodion process?

I think it’s good.  I know there are some grumblings about how fashionable or faddish it is, but I like it that people still want to work with historical processes. It’s nice to keep the craft alive and I don’t think it should be an exclusive thing.  People do Wet Collodion  for various reasons, whether it is artistic, historical or chemical, and that is up to them.  I don’t really worry about what others are doing or why they are doing it as long as they are nice about it!  🙂

What is your favourite alternative photography process?

I have just started Bromoil and although it’s been quite a frustrating process to learn, I have to say I am loving it. At the moment, it’s my favourite!  I never really got into cyanotypes or platinum. I love collodion, but feel I have done enough and after 4 years, it’s time to try something new!

Is the material nature of the analogue process something that is significant within your work?

I try not to hide behind a process, I hope my work is engaging enough regardless.  However, I would be lying if I said it wasn’t important.  For me the process is part of the work in the same way the camera is, it’s a tool for what I want to convey.  For example, using a large format camera and the collodion process allowed me to work with the children in a way that would have been possible with another camera or medium. However, the collodion process is slow and the children engaged with it beautifully.  Sometimes, the children would lay for a minute in total stillness and that is where the process becomes important.  I am working on another series at the moment and although it’s very early days, I know what I am trying to portray and the Bromoil process will be perfect for it.

You often photograph your own children, could you explain why your children are an important subject for you to photograph?

I always believe in photographing what you love, what you know and understand intimately, and this happens to be my children.  I have done other kinds of photography (such as street and documentary) but it takes me away from my family. In this way, I am living with my photography.  I also photograph other children and although I didn’t know them as well as my own children, I did feel a connection with them. For example, when I look through the viewfinder & see a child, I remember my child, what it’s like to be a child and this inspires me.

You revisit your own childhood memories within your photography, could you say more about this?

This started as a project at university. We had to do something staged and I wanted to photograph my children so that I would be spending time with them and not going off to work on a project elsewhere. I decided to record moments from my own childhood and the project evolved & changed over the years to what you see now but it became an important part of my work.

Having children also made me reconnect to my childhood. I will be honest that at times I felt hurt or angry about it and although it’s probably a cliché, confronting some of these memories through my photography was very cathartic.  Although, the series ‘memory’ was the one that dealt more specifically with my childhood (particularly school) I think there is always a bit of me that seeps into my work. The photographs are about my children, but they are also about me and my relationship with them.

London Alternative Photography Collective, March Meeting

On Wednesday 5th March at 6.30pm, London Alternative Photography Collective will be meeting at The Double Negative Darkroom at 178A Glyn Road in Hackney.
We will be providing refreshments, and an opportunity to chat about alternative photography processes.

There will be talks from;

DAVID BLACKMORE

Liquid Crystal Display, David Blackmore

Liquid Crystal Display, David Blackmore

 
Over the past year David has been working on a number of works including his archive of 100 lucky pennies, a walk from Mizen to Malin Head without passing a pub, Cracked LCDs, Liquid Crystal Displays and a private commission in Dublin.

In ‘Liquid Crystal Displays’ Blackmore has been working with broken Liquid Crystal Display Screens from the latest digital devices such as lap tops, phones and cameras; technologies that play a large part in our modern daily routines. These digital forms have almost completely replaced analogue technology in industry and are fast replacing analogue forms in photographic art. This body of work has been exhibited as an installation of the illuminated screens themselves during the Pixxelpoint New Media Art Festival. Along side this David has been making photographic prints of the screens using solely analogue photographic equipment and processes, Blackmore’s work catalogues and questions the place of obsolete technology in art and contemporary life.
These works were also exhibited at Constanza Isaza Martinez’ exhibition “Material Light”.

Aside from his own artistic practice Blackmore is a part time lecturer at the University for the Creative Arts. David has also guest lectured at a number of institutions including the University of Westminster and the Institute for Art, Design and Technology, Dublin.

BRUNO FREITAS DE OLIVEIRA

Bruno Freitas De Oliveira

Bruno Freitas De Oliveira, 2013

Bruno Freitas De Oliveira, 2013

Bruno Freitas De Oliveira, 2013

Bruno studied Post Graduate Photography at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design in 2007. Regularly exhibiting in London at Stour Space, The Crypt, V22, Oil Tanks Tate Modern and The Hamni Gallery. In 2013, Bruno graduated from MA Fine Art at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design, was awarded the Artists & Collectors Exchange Bursary, shortlisted for the Red Mansion Award and selected for Tacita Dean’s workshop at Fundación Botín in Santander. Currently he is the Artist-In-Residence in Croydon School of Art.

About London Alternative Photography Collective 

The London Alternative Photography Collective aims to bring together artists and photographers around London who wish to share alternative photography ideas and processes.

The group will meet at the Double Negative Darkroom at 178A Glyn Road in Hackney, E5 0JE.

We provide artists talks, discussions about Alternative Photography Processes, demonstrations and opportunities to collaborate.
Anyone interested in Alternative Photography is welcome to join.

About Double Negative Darkroom 

Double Negative Darkroom Is a budding, London independent photographic community and lab. Fast becoming a European centre for Alternative photographic process and Silver gelatin teaching and learning.

As Double Negative provides free refreshments at the London Alternative Photography Collective, we would ask that you bring a £3 donation (£2 to darkroom members) to the event.

FACEBOOK EVENT
EVENTBRITE

London Alternative Photography Collective, February Meeting

On Wednesday 5th February at 6.30pm, London Alternative Photography Collective will be meeting at The Double Negative Darkroom at 178A Glyn Road in Hackney.
We will be providing refreshments, and an opportunity to chat about alternative photography processes.

There will be talks from;

MATT MARTIN

The Photocopy Club, Jerwood Space

The Photocopy Club, Jerwood Space

Matt will be coming to talk about his project The Photocopy club, an innovative exhibitions project based in Brighton, London and Hong Kong.

The Photocopy Club recently exhibited in the Jerwood Space, and are now resident at Doomed Gallery Dalston.

The Photocopy Club exhibit works made entirely with photocopiers, with the aim of making photography and printed work more accessible to the public.

TINA ROWE

TINA ROWE Acrylic medium, ink jet ink, chinese hand made paper, gold leaf. 80×80 2013

TINA ROWE Acrylic medium, ink jet ink, chinese hand made paper, gold leaf. 80×80 2013

Tina Rowe, a regular at Double Negative Darkroom, has been creating some interesting work with her own photographic emulsion recipes as well as her wide angle pinhole camera experiments.

DAVID LEISTER

David Leister, Wind Up, 16mm Film

David Leister, Wind Up, 16mm Film

David Leister is an established filmmaker who has been an active member of the film community in London since 1983 and regularly assists other artists with the presentation of their film work with his celebrated 16mm looping system. He has over a dozen films in distribution with LUX that are regularly included in experimental film programmes and festivals both in the UK and in Europe. He has an extensive 16mm archive of discarded educational and information films from the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, which formed the basis for The Kino Club, his platform for combining improvised film and music in an informal cabaret-club setting, with David Leister as host and projectionist.
Leister will be talking and screening films at this months meeting.

About London Alternative Photography Collective

The London Alternative Photography Collective aims to bring together artists and photographers around London who wish to share alternative photography ideas and processes.

The group will meet at the Double Negative Darkroom at 178A Glyn Road in Hackney, E5 0JE.

We provide artists talks, discussions about Alternative Photography Processes, demonstrations and opportunities to collaborate.
Anyone interested in Alternative Photography is welcome to join.

About Double Negative Darkroom

Double Negative Darkroom Is a budding, London independent photographic community and lab. Fast becoming a European centre for Alternative photographic process and Silver gelatin teaching and learning.

As Double Negative provides free refreshments at the London Alternative Photography Collective, we would ask that you bring a £3 donation (£2 to darkroom members) to the event.

FACEBOOK EVENT
EVENTBRITE